An IoT-connected PowerPoint multi-device show!

Today I was honoured to have the opportunity to discuss the challenges and opportunities IoT brings to the world of technical documentation in a keynote for the inaugural Cambridge meet-up of the Write The Docs community.

One of the topics I covered was how IoT enables human-computer interaction across a much broader range of devices than the traditional screen, keyboard and pointing device – the 4th generation user interface as Steve Wilson describes it – leading to richer, more natural, and more immersive experiences for users of applications (in the broadest sense).

To help illustrate this in the context of a presentation I decided to extend the slideshow beyond the projector and slide clicker and include lights and buttons to create a more entertaining experience. For example I talked about some of the opportunities devices such as Amazon Echo could create. As I reached the relevant slide a set of LEDs came on to illuminate an actual Echo device on a stand on the stage. I also had a large push-button illuminated with controllable multi-coloured LEDs; this became a software-defined push-button which did different things during the course of the presentation including advancing slides, turning off the LEDs, and so on. The LED colour and action assigned to the button were controlled based on the slide being projected.

As usual I used Octoblu as the IoT automation platform. A key input to the flow was a trigger for each time the PowerPoint presentation advanced a slide. To do this I created a PowerPoint macro named “OnSlideShowPageChange” (called in the obvious manner by the application) which sent a HTTP POST to an Octoblu trigger with the current slide number and the total number of slides from the presentation.

Sub OnSlideShowPageChange(ByVal SSW As SlideShowWindow)
    Set objHTTP = CreateObject("MSXML2.ServerXMLHTTP")
    URL = "https://triggers.octoblu.com/v2/flows/<UUID>/triggers/<UUID>"
    objHTTP.Open "POST", URL, False
    objHTTP.setRequestHeader "User-Agent", "Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Windows NT 5.0)"
    objHTTP.setRequestHeader "Content-Type", "application/json"
    objHTTP.send "{""currentSlide"":" & SSW.View.CurrentShowPosition & ",""numSlides"":" & SSW.Presentation.Slides.Count & "}"
End Sub
To drive PowerPoint I created a new Octoblu connector that runs on my laptop that can remote control a PowerPoint slideshow. This is a very simple connector that really just adds an Octoblu shim on top of the excellent slideshow NPM library. The connector can do a few things but the most useful is the “GotoSlide” endpoint which can take a slide number, or one of “next”, “prev”, “first” or “last”. A simple example of using it in a flow is:
pptnode
(BTW if you want to use my connectors see https://github.com/jamesbulpin/my-meshblu-connectors for how to add my custom connector repository to your own Octoblu account. All the custom connectors in this blog post can be found in that repo.)
The flow looks rather more complex that it really is:
pptflowannotated
There are essentially five main parts to the flow:
  1. The trigger from the PowerPoint macro (telling us which slide is being shown) setting the state of a string of WS2811 LEDs (using my WS2811 Raspberry Pi connector which is also in the repo mentioned above) based on which slide is being shown. These LEDs illuminate the Echo and a few other props. The JSON templates contain configuration to tell the WS2811 connector which LEDs to turn on to illuminate the relevant prop. When the final slide is shown the entire string is put into a moving pattern (just for fun 🙂 ).
  2. The slide number is also used to show a slide progress bar on a second string of WS2811 LEDs. The connector takes the current slide number and the total number of slides. With the LEDs in the string mapping to slides in the presentation in a one-to-one manner, it turns LEDS green for slides already shown, red for those not yet shown, and yellow for the currently showing slide.
  3. The slide number is used to define the colour of the illuminated push-button (or to turn it off entirely) and to send it a string which the button will return (see below) if pushed – this makes the function of the button dynamically configurable depending on which slide is being shown.
  4. If the push-button is pushed it sends the string configured in #3 above. This part of the flow dispatches messages depending on that string. If it’s “ON” all the LEDs on both strings are put into a moving pattern and “OFF” turns all LEDs off. Otherwise it’s interpreted as a slideshow command (e.g. “next”) and routed to the PowerPoint connector described earlier.
  5. An additional effect of the button push in the “ON” and “OFF” cases is setting the button to do the opposite, i.e. if the push was “ON” then the button is reconfigured for “OFF”.

An aside on the WS2811 connector: This works by specifying a mode (via a parameter on the message) and, depending on the mode, some additional parameters such as colour or slide number. Currently the available modes are:

  • “off” – what you’d expect
  • “solid” (or “color”) – display a solid colour on all LEDs – requires the “color” parameter (can be a word such as “red” or hash hex value such as “#00553e”)
  • “slide” – the slide progress bar described above – requires “slide” and “slidemax” parameters
  • “colorwheel” – a moving and colour-changing dynamic pattern
  • “twinkle” – colorwheel modulated with a random twinkling (each LED turning on and off randomly)
  • “percent” – show a percentage bargraph (“VU meter” style) on the LEDs – requires the “percent” parameter, turns on the first percent% of the LEDs
  • “direct” – takes a JSON object containing a description of which LEDs should be which colour: pass the object (e.g. using the JSON Template node and passing {{msg}} in the parameter) containing a key named “groups” which is a list of objects with “color” (string color name/hascode) and “leds” (a list of integer LED index with the first LED on the wire being zero) parameters.

e.g.:

{
  "groups":[
    {
      "color":"blue",
      "leds":[1,3,5,9]
    },
    {
      "color":"red",
      "leds":[0,10,132]
    }
  ]
}

(This WS2811 connector, developed in collaboration with John Moody, is a better version of the one I described in a previous post – see that post for info on the wiring.)

Now of course there are ways to do similar things to all of this without IoT but like many things with IoT it’s the removal of barriers of cost, accessibility and vendor compatibility that make an IoT approach interesting.

If you’re at Citrix Synergy 2017 in Orlando later this month be sure to join me and a growing list of IoT and automation experts for SYN401 to see what else is possible with the Octoblu platform. I can guarantee that the PowerPoint (there won’t be much – it’s a far more interactive session than that!) will be even more IoT than in today’s event!

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